Swedish

 

Loose measure (the same as level teaspoonful) was a measure without packing or shaking. 
A firm measured means heaped measure. 
In firm measure, 1 barrel of grain = 36 kappers = 164.9 liters.

However, great care must be taken when it comes to old measures.  New measurement regulations have changed meaning through the centuries.  Measurements have, even though they had the same name, had different meanings in different Nordic countries.  For example a Fjärding (quarter) is a Norwegian measure that held 34.74 liters.  However, a Swedish Fjärding was 18.3 liters or a quartz bucket. 

What then was a Kronor?

The origin is in the 1500's when the king had more power to control and create taxes.

After the 1760's Sweden was divided into different districts.

The government symbol, year, district head’s initials, date, and denomination number were burned into all governments.  It was also used on the Lars-John’s barrel.

Even the government has had different meanings through the years, but the government which was in use during Lars-Johns time probably meant "sanctioned by the state" or "approved to be correct".  In that case proof that the article must be of the proper value. 

Gradually the metric system and decimal system came into the picture in the latter half of the 1800's.

The measurements were rounded off upwards or downwards according to the approved local rounding system. 

It can be interesting to study some old measures.

Old Measurements of Length and Distance:

Swedish

Metric

English

approximate  U.S.  equivalent

Svensk Mil

10.7 Kilometers (3,600 Enclosed)

Swedish Mile

6.6 Miles

Pilskott

228 Meters

Arrow Shot

249 Yards

Musköthåll

225 Meters

Musket Hole

246 Yards

Riphäll

50 to 60 Meters

 

55 to 65 Yards

Stenkast

40 to 50 Meters

Stone’s Throw

44 to 55 Yards

Spjutkast

35 to 50 Meters

Spear Throw

38 to 55 Yards

Enclosed

2.97 Meters (1.67 Famn)

Rod

9.7 Feet

Fjärdingsväg

2.672 Meters (4.500 Alnars {9 feet})

 

8.8 Feet

Famnar

1.78 Meters (3 Alnars { feet})

Fathom

5.8 Feet

Alnars { feet}

0.59 Meters ( 2 Fot)

 

23 Inches

Fot

0.296892 Meters

 

11.7 Inches

Kvarter

0.15 Meters (¼ Alnars { feet})

 

5.9 Inches

Verktum

0.025 Meters

 

1 Inch

Fingerbredd

2.47 Centimeters

Finger Width

1.0 Inch

Verklinje

0.00206175 Meters

 

0.1 Inches

Knogmätt, Krympaln

62.64 Centimeters

Knuckle Length

24 Inches

 

After 1699 the distance between inns was supposed to be one Swedish mile.

Yxkast, dagsled, kyndelsmil, näverskomil, are other unidentified measures.

Old Measurement of Area:

Swedish

Metric

English

approximate  U.S.  equivalent

Acre

4,963.568 square Meters

 

1.2 Acre or 53,400 SF

Spannland

2,468.284 square Meters
(½ Acre)

 

0.6 Acre or 26,700 SF

Halvspannland

1,234.142 square Meters
(½ Spannland)

 

0.3 Acre 13,350 SF

Maling

1/6 Acre

 

0.2 Acre or 8,900 SF

Trög

1/6 Acre or 1 Maling

 

0.2 Acre or 8,900 SF

Fjärdingsland

617.071 square Meters
(¼ Spannland)

 

0.15 Acre or 6,640 SF

Kappland

154.3 square Meters

 

0.0375 Acre or 1,660 SF

Kannland

88.15 square Meters

 

948 SF

 

 

Old Dry Measures: (1 Liter = 0.908 Quarts in Dry Measure)

Swedish

Metric

English

approximate  U.S.  equivalent

Läst

24 barrel

Ton

100 Bushels

Barrel

146.55 Liters

Barrel

4 Bushels

Spann

73.3 Liters (½ barrel)

?

2 Bushels (½ barrel)

Fjärding

18.32 Liters
(¼ Spann or 4 Kappe)

Quarter

0.5 Bushels (1/8 barrel)

Ask

6.8 Liters

Box

1.5 Gallons

Kappe

4.58 Liters

Peck

1.0 Gallons

Kanna

2.617 Liters (or 1/10 of a Swedish kubikfot)

Tankard

0.6 Gallons (or 0.09 American cubic foot)

 

Another ordinary measure was the bushel, but here we are not able to determine a definite amount.  It is well-known that it had different meaning in different parts of Sweden from the 1200's until it was standardized in 1735.  In Jämtland a bushel appears to have been about 30 liters.

Old Measurements of Volume (Dry - 1 Liter = 0.908 Quarts in Dry Measure):

Swedish

Metric

English

approximate  U.S.  equivalent

Fodder

942.12 Liters

 

26.75 Bushels

Bryggspann

735 Liters

 

20.8 Bushels

Pipa

471 Liters

 

13.5 Bushels

Oxhuvud

236 Liters

OxHead

6.75 Bushels

Drittel, Basins

157.02 Liters

Basin

4.48 Bushels

Kista, Putty

125.5 Liters

Chest, Kettle

3.5 Bushels

Hummerträ

62 Liters

 

1.75 Bushels

41.87 Liters

Tub

1.2 Bushels

Fingerborg, Ankare

39.25 Liters

Thimble, Anchor

1.1 Bushels

Balja

50 to 150

Pod

?

Grepp, Handelsläst, Handfull, Hink

10 to 12 Liters

Grip, Handelsläst, Handful, Bucket

2.3 to 2.7 Gallons

Kopp, Krucka, Kutting

15 to 39 Liters

Cup, Jar, Pot

3.4 to 8.9 Gallons

Kar, Kagge

12 to 15 Liters

Keg

2.7 to 3.4 Gallons

Skå

3 Liters

Bowl

0.7 Gallons

Stop

1.3 Liters

 

1.2 Quarts

Price

0.5 Liters

Pinch

0.5 Quarts

Bunke

several Liters

 

several Quarts

Bägare

seldom over two deciliters

Goblet

seldom over 0.2 Quarts

Sillkärra, Rack load

18 barrels

Herring Cart

 

Kolstig, Kolryss

12 barrels or 19 hg Liters

Coal Cart

 

Gilling (Norwegian measure of hay)

255 Kilograms

 

562 Pounds

Smörtunna

132 to 136 Kilograms

Butter barrel

291 to 300 Pounds

Vedfamn

1 cubic Meter

Cord of Wood

35 cubic Feet

 

Liquids had a different measurement system from dry materials: (1 Liter = 1.057 Quarts in Liquid Measure)

Old Measurements of Liquids

Swedish

Metric

English

approximate  U.S.  equivalent

Kanna

2,617 Liters

 

690 Gallons

barrel

125.6 Liters

barrel

33.2 Gallons

Fjärding

62.8 Liters

 

16.6 Gallons

Åtting

31.4 Liters

 

8.3 Gallons

Sextondel

15.7 Liters

 

4.15 Gallons

Stop

1.3 Liters

 

1.37 Quarts

Kvarter

0.327 Liters (¼ Stop)

Quart

0.35 Quarts

Jungfru

0.08 Liters

 

0.1 Quarts

 

Valid measures in the days copper had to be weighed:

Swedish

Metric

English

approximate  U.S.  equivalent

Skeppspund viktualievikt

20 lisspund

Shipping Pound, Provisional Weight

 376 Pounds

Lispund

8.5 Kilograms

 

18.8 Pounds

Stapelvikt

6.8 Kilograms or 0.8 Lispund

 

15 Pounds

Lispund

20 Skålpund

 

18.8 Pounds

Skålpund

0.425 Kilograms

Swedish Pound

0.94 Pounds

 

This was a letter sent to the press, and was in Östersund’s Posten dated January 1, 1990.  It was written by Kalle Berglund of Svenstavik. 

The American decimal measures have been rounded off to give only rough approximations of the metric equivalent.