Swedish

Märet Andersdotter 

Table 25

 

Agnis Edberg3, Kerstin Randklef 2,, Agnis Nilsdotter1 & Måns Essing1

C6

Page 55

Märet Andersdotter

B

Nov 1780

  

Märet lived in Österuppland,

  

  

D

  

  

Mörsil.

  

  

M

Jan 15, 1809

  

Mårten was a farmer and Sexton.  He was the first to be buried in Mörsil cemetery. Mårten was buried on October 12, 1856.

S

Mårten Olofsson Lang 

B

June 2, 1779

  

  

  

  

D

about  Oct 3, 1856

  

  

D1

Agneta "Agnes" Lang

B

Nov 24, 1808

  

  

  

  

D

1832

  

  

D2

Olof Lang

B

Feb 11, 1811

  

Olof died as a child.

  

  

D

 

  

  

D3

Brita Lang

B

Sep 4, 1814

  

  

Table 71

  

D

Mar 27, 1891

Sellsjö

  

D4

Anders Lang

B

Aug 20, 1816

  

Anders died of

  

  

D

July 14, 1821

  

Measles.

D5

Olof Lang

B

Aug 20, 1821

  

Olof drowned in Töjsans? Alsen.  Olof worked there as a farmhand.  He never married.

  

  

D

June 1, 1878

  

  

D6

Maria Lang

B

July 11, 1824

  

  

  

  

D

Oct 11, 1824

  

  

D7

Anna Lang

B

May 18, 1826

  

  

Table 72

  

D

June 8, 1892

Sellsved, Kall

  

 

From the Recorded Minutes of the General Parish Records of June 3, 1843 in Mörsil, it was resolved that Sexton Mårten Lang is to annually receive 1 kanna[1] of grain from every homestead account[2].  Therefore, it is his responsibility to fulfill the duties of Sexton etc.  But he does not receive the right to live in the Parish cottage without understood him Parish man to keep firewood and look after the fire every time he fulfills God’s duties here in the church is held and he shall start in the eastern part of the Parish and later conduct these duties in the western part.

The Population Records describe Mårten Lang as being poor and in frail health.  A Distress Warrant List mentions that cavalryman Mårten Lang missed all his tax payments[3], and has other small children, one of which was mentally deficient.  Later Mårten’s wife had only very paltry clothes, is elderly, and she was a laboring person after she became a widow.

 

Mårten Nilsson in Bye

This is a story about Mårten Lang’s maternal grandfather and mother, and is interesting reading.  It was taken from the first part of Mörsil Chronicle.

One would expect to find some special notes in the old Parish Records about the 1700's most distinguished person in Mörsil, about whom the old people who lived into the 1800's had so much to say.  But it only states: “Mårten Nilsson ifrån Bye dog den 7 Oktober 1791 af ålderdomsbräcklighet, 78 år gammal ” {Mårten Nilsson from Bye died of from natural causes of old age on October 7, 1791 at 78 years of age}.  His farm at the time must have been very remarkable.  The guest room had wallpaper on the walls.  It was made of paper and had green patterns of candle bottoms painted in oil colors. 

He had an unusual thirst for activity and capacity for work.  He was also a prudent businessman and a clever farmer, which was helpful.

His business trips stretched beyond Jämtland border to Hedemora, Falun, Sollefteå, Graninge and in all probability to Stockholm and Norway.  One of his farmhands (Strand Jonas who died in 1840} was ninety years of age when he said that these trips were completed bravely.  On southern visits he often used to kid and joke the Jämtlanders for their black gammalost {literally “old cheese”, a well known and odiferous type of cheese common to Scandinavia}.

Mårten built a sawmill near Sjön Anjan {Lake Anjan}.  Although the old stories do not give any mäler [4], it is likely that he was not alone in the enterprise.  It was observed to be operated on a very large scale.  The boards were freighted with a cargo boat or a large ferry across the three mil {18 American miles} long lake to the Norwegian border, and from there it was transported to Norway, where it was sold.  This was probably the first export of lumber from Jämtland to a foreign country.

The diary records of Fale Burman mention the sawmill in 1791 before it came to an end.

As an example of how well off Mårten in Bye was, it was said that in the summertime he equipped a crew with no less than 11 pack horses and did commercial mountain fishing in the mountain lakes.

Another reference of a hufvul  = “tiden mellan våranden och höanden" {time between the springtime harvest and haying time}" he took with him his domestic servants and 14 horses, pack horses, cows, sheep and goats, and pulled away southwest through the forest wilderness catre  mil to the upper mountain regions of Rulldalen to establish a new summer mountain cottage. 

He cleared the land and the cottages were built in a short time.  All went well for Mårten in Bye.  His daughter Ärsil and a maid stayed there as farm maidens.  The barn had a wooden roof that was built too low, so that in the summer ahead when the pine bark roof became dry, the cows stuck their horns up through it.

The summer was a rich “multsommar – multa=hjortron” {long summer – rich wqith clourdberries which are a wildfruit delicacy}".  Årsil and her comrades gathered and boiled the cloudberries and filled every container they could spare. Finally they received boundary mark[5] in the Laplander tradition of "Akja" {????} and filled everything with a great abundance of food.

In the autumn, when the master and his men returned, they brought home summer food of “smör, ost och messmör, som tillverkats under sommaren” {butter, cheese and soft butter, which was produced during the summer}.  They were tired of multkirrisa [6], which they emptied on the slope.  Upon looking at the wastefulness of this – all their diligent work and the mountain’s abundance of luscious fruit - the girls started to cry loudly.

Mårten tried to get a few neighbors together with him to build a bridge across Mörsilälven (the Mörsil River), but this did not succeed.  They were probably afraid to, since Mårten would have more use for the bridge than they did.  On another occasion he had proposed building a rolling pin[7] bridge but they still do not want to participate.  It was completely unnecessary in their opinion!  Their joint mountain cottage road went directly ahead above a sank swampland directly on this side of Gisterän.  It was above this mire that a bridge should be built.

But Mårten does not allow himself to have any resentment, and he builds the bridge himself.  When his neighbors afterwards should "buföra " (lead livestock to the summer mountain pasture), Mårten, who was a large and strong man with a smart walking stick in his hands with a bronze end, wanted to embarrass them as he led cattle and people and packhorses down to the marshy swampland.  He said that he wanted this demonstration to convince them obstinately and reluctantly that the bridge was necessary. 

For a long time the local church had become outgrown.  Mårten in Bye was the soul and driving force in everything.  He proposed, and succeeded in forcing his proposal through, to increase the church’s length to the west by 8 alnars {16 feet}.  The ground was prepared and the preparatory work was begun, but for some unknown reason the project stopped.  Perhaps they had begun to think of a new church in Mörsil - a thought that was realized about a hundred years later.  Amazingly enough, Mårten, whose legs were deteriorating by then, also contributed his own labor to the new church building.  For the proposed widening of the old church, he had broken limestone that was walled up for ovens that were never fired in Byeskogen near the Frisk farm, so they used it when the present church was built.

Mårten was as helpful as he was industrious.  One summer in Över-Ocke a fire occurred, which destroyed the entire farm of his brother Nils Bleckman. This same farm now constitutes "Fredriks" and "Sjölanders[8]".  However it was in the midst of a busy summertime that Mårten Nilsson sent his crew and their horses to help his brother itänsk  homeless rebuild the farm.  Timber was hewn and hauled to the farm and construction work went on from early in the morning until late at night and in 3 weeks time the entire farm was completely rebuilt.  That "de fäällt bäre vinnroa a raufärja " (it lacked only a weather-vane and red paint), said Old Lena in Ol ’ Ols[9] of Eggen, who told this story.

The family life of Mårten Nilsson was less fortunate.  Children brought up by him did not do very well.  It was said that daughter Årsil had earlier “låg bort sig, dvs. fick ett oäkta barn” {had sexual relations with a man and an illegitimate child}”.  That was something that was regarded as a great dishonor for both her and her family.  However, she later married a poor youth from Bleckåsen by the name of Erik Jönsson.

This man was sometimes afflicted with drinking binges, and when he “var på tura” {was on a dringing binge} with reference to his wife’s status as a fallen woman, jokingly state:  “Ha int flässhe dytte ne i lort'n, ha int'n Erek Jänssa fått’e” {If the flesh hadn’t fallen into the dirt, Erek Jänssa [slang term referring to himself] wouldn’t have gotten it}.

“På riksspråket; Hade inte fläsket fallit ner I smutsen, hade inte hunden fått det eller, hade inte fått det”.  {In the official language, if the meat hadn’t fallen to the ground, the dog wouldn’t have gotten it, and he wouldn’t have gotten his wife if she hadn’t fallen in status with her previous pregnancy}.

Their son Bengt was a disgrace to the entire family, a real rotten egg.  One time he stole money from his father.  After his sentence he was drinking in a tavern with churchwarden Daniel Reddell of Bye.  At this time, King Gustaf III had issued a gracious circular to all the cathedral chapters in the realm, wherein he urges the ecclesiastical authorities to promote the establishment of a Royal Tavern in each church area through the parsons.  A result of this was Rödell’s Tavern in Mörsil.  Jon Pers of Bye was in this tavern on a drinking binge with Bengt Mårtensson.  They were using the stolen money.  Then he received a serious rebuke from his father for this crime and for his reprehensible lifestyle.  Bengt disappeared after he laid his bare hands on his father and struck and mistreated his father.

He received both lashes and a prison sentence.  He was also strongly suspected for the arson murder at the Daniel Rödell house, which burnt down at the time.  He should then have been broken down on the run from prison.  Down bed clothes, precious the time, grain, dried meat, etc. became the fuel for the flames.  As the churchwarden, Rödell had kept the church’s possessions and deeds in his tavern, in addition to his own valuables and papers, which were all destroyed for all eternity.

When the wife of Anders Larsson of Myckelgård saw the flames from the fire flare up, and after she had determined which house, as it burnt is said to have exclaimed to her husband:  “Gudskelov, ätt skinnstyfran (af skinna, klå) häns Daniel I Byom brinn opp” {Thank God, the descendants skin stuff (of skin, clothes) häns Daniel in Byom have burned up}.

With malicious pleasure she[10] explained that her husband was a boozer and destroyed the houses affluence on tavern with Rödell[11]

Daughter Brita also caused her parents some concern.  She had two suitors.  One was called Olof Göransson of Hinterland, and he was a prominent and dignified youngster that her parents would gl adly like to have for a son-in-law.  The other, Per Jönsson of Bye, a shoemaker and fiddler, dared to have been of bad scrap and grain[12], but however such as in for a decline frequent affliction happen[13], stood higher in the girls fancies.  Sharp feuds arose.  Then one time the father was made aware that Per had visited his daughter in Gistervallen where she was a farm maiden.  He made his way there as soon as he could, put another girl in her place, and took Brita home with him.

Per had gotten word that her father “var bort i buan” {was away on a hoot or drinking binge]}, suspected what errand applied[14].  He sneaked unnoticed down towards the river bank in the evening and he hid among some bushes near the landing-pier, then waited for her to come home.  He did not have to wait long.  She followed readily in a boat and came over the river!  He barely raised his hand to make some sign to Brita, and she became aware of his presence.  She had not gone far from the beach when she remembered that she had forgotten the boat, which she must return, and so – the father came home without his daughter that evening. 

However, in this love story the parent’s wishes succeeded in the end. 

Brita eventually married Olof Göransson, and they became the parents of three of the “Finlands-kämparna” {Fighters of Finland} from Mörsil: Köstin, Bång and Lang.  Their fourth son, Nils became a farmer in Äsom. 

Bång and Köstin were killed[15] in Finland, but Mårten Lang came back from the war with his remaining comrades and lived with his wife Märit for their remaining days on his farm, which was located near the current farm of Erik Lithström in Österuppland.  His cottage was named after himself, Langstugan (Lang Cottage).

On November 3, 1856, an Estate Assessment was conducted after pensioner Mårten Lang of Hinterland died on the 3rd of October and left a widow and three children behind.  The children were son Olof, of legal age[16], daughter Brita married to Company Worker Erik Hansson of Fäviken, and Anna, married to Pehr Nilsson Lind of Sällsved. 

All were present and the property is appraised and sold afterwards by his surviving wife Märit Andersdotter.  The statement and assessment were as follows:

 

{48 Species per Riksdaler}

 

  

  

  

Banco

  

  

  

  

Rd  Sp

1

ea

Copper Kettle 9 ms

6.

  

  

  

Subtotal brought forward from left below

 

9.6

1

ea

Coffee Pot

.36

  

2

ea

Cooking Pots

1.

1

ea

Cutting ax and 1 Broad Ax

.12

  

1

ea

Roasting Kettle

.8

1

ea

Mullgref

. 8

  

1

ea

Wooden Lye Container

.12

1

ea

Hamme and hoftång

. 6

  

1

ea

Chest

. 6

1

ea

iron spoon

. 8

  

3

ea

Rope Handled Pails

.16

1

ea

Smaller Låggiron

. 4

  

1

ea

Wax Polish

. 4

1

ea

Pickaxe

.12

  

2

ea

  

.16

1

ea

Handsaw

.16

  

3

ea

Tubs

.12

1

ea

Hålskafvare

. 8

  

3

ea

Stone basins

.10

1

ea

Hay Chucker?

. 4

  

1

ea

Wooden Cups etc.

. 2

1

ea

List hifvil å winkil

. 2

  

2

ea

Backmäjsar

. 8

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

1

ea

Straight Knife with Box

. 4

  

5

ea

Waste Fabric?

. 6

1

ea

Box with Scrapiron

. 2

  

1

ea

Cupboard

. 2

1

ea

Whittling knife

. 4

  

4

ea

Trough

. 4

1

ea

Auger, etc.

. 8

  

  

  

  

12.16

1

ea

Brass Box

.16

  

  

  

Estage demand from 

  

  

  

 

9.6

  

  

  

Agnis Andersdotter of Bye

  

  

  

Mens and Working Clothes

  

  

  

  

for pension and Burial help

20.38

2

ea

Hats

.18

  

  

  

  

  

1

ea

Waist Coats

1.16

  

  

  

  

  

1

ea

Blue Trouseers and Sweater

2.16

  

  

  

Total Assets

55.47

2

ea

Corset

.24

  

  

  

The Estate’s Debts

  

1

ea

 ” of leather

. 8

  

  

  

Nils Mattsson of Högen

10.16

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

1

ea

Old Trousers & Sweater

1. 4

  

  

  

Daniel Ersson of Bye

1.28

1

ea

Reindeer Pelt with

  

  

  

  

Funeral costs

10.

  

  

skjerp

1.

  

  

  

the Testament?

.24

1

pr

Dogskin gloves

.12

  

  

  

for Bakning and burial

1.16

1

ea

Shirt of Cotton

1.

  

  

  

Paid to assessor

  

1

pr

Stockings of thread

.32

  

  

  

Jon Nilsson of Bye

1.

1

pr

Snow socks

.12

  

  

  

Jonas Ersson of Högen

1.16

1

pr

Suspenders

. 8

  

  

  

  

25.  4

2

ea

Scarves

.16

  

  

  

Total Balance

30.43

1

pr

High Boots, 2 pair shoes

3

  

  

  

  

  

1

ea

Cane

. 8

  

  

  

  

  

3

ea

Leather Säkar

1.

  

  

  

Then all of the property

  

1

ea

Strop Säk

. 1

  

  

  

and claims, which occur with a

  

1

ea

Sheepskin hide

3.

  

  

  

man’s death, are officially

  

1

ea

   ”        ”  old

1.

  

  

  

declared and not the smallest

  

1

ea

Pillow

.16

  

  

  

thereof with wish and sufficient intelligence

  

1

ea

Strop Bed

1.

  

  

  

concealed or forgotten according to the law

  

ea

Cotton yarn

1.12

  

  

  

Oath is confirmed as given.

  

ea

Wool yarn

1.36

  

  

  

  

  

6

ea

Flax to

1.

  

  

  

Märit M Andersdotter

  

  

  

  

35.15

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

 

The preceding property is rightfully evaluated and this assessment is certified on the above year and date. 

Jon Nilsson of Bye Jonas Ersson of Högen.  The poor share is paid and a receipt given by Olof Larsson of Ocke to get rid of it.



[1] 1 kanna equals about ½ gallon.

[2] Homestead fireplace or homestead account (räkna)?

[3] tax payments?

[4] target? goal?  production goals? production statistics?

[5] Tag is days or take or maybe partake?

[6] multkirrisa ?

[7] bridge above the river prepared with smaller logs or round logs close to each other, directly crossing the river

[8] Are Fredriks and Sjölanders well known farms or landmarks.

[9] Is “Ol ’ Ols” a book?

[10] she being the wife of Daniel?

[11] spelman?

[12] scrap and grain?

[13] needs work.

[14] errand applied?

[15] Stupade means were killed?

[16] is there a better word or phrase?